Review: Like Me, hypnotic and counfounding

Robert Mockler’s debut couldn’t have come at a better time, where our media-hungry society is more concerned about clicks, shares, and views than almost anything else. His film tells the story of a young woman who sets out on a crime spree, broadcasting every horrible minute of it to the world. A few years ago, Mockler’s […]

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Review: Super Dark Times, what have you done

You’d never know that Super Dark Times is Kevin Phillips’ first feature length film without looking it up. He shows so much elegance behind the camera, framing each shot deliberately and with aplomb—Phillips’ dark tone and atmosphere are on full display here, often using these lingering shots to speak volumes, telling us exactly what his […]

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Review: It Comes at Night, boiling panic

Trey Edward Shults may not be a name you’re too familiar with—his first feature film was 2015’s drama Krisha—but with the help of a studio like A24 backing his indie viral-thriller It Comes at Night, it’s not at all surprising to see his second film gain so much traction throughout the genre. Shults’ low budget […]

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Review: Gerald’s Game, the past is haunting

Mike Flanagan quickly made a name for himself among the horror genre after turning heads with Abstentia and following it up with the well-received Oculus back in 2013. Flanagan has been busy ever since, quickly turning out four more films—Hush, Before I Wake, Ouija: Origin of Evil, and now his latest with Gerald’s Game. When […]

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Review: IT, you’ll float too

Andy Muschietti was a curious choice for New Line when they first announced that he would be taking over the new adaptation of IT that was once so comfortably in the hands of Cary Fukunaga. At the time the only feature film to Muschietti’s name was Mama, which was a very by-the-numbers supernatural haunter—not exactly the […]

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Fantasia Review: 68 Kill, love is pain

I think it’s safe to say that if you put Matthew Gray Gubler and AnnaLynne McCord in a movie, it will, at the very least, be varying degrees of hilarious and batshit crazy. That, too, happens to be the exact formula for Trent Haaga’s decisively dirty, ultra-violent 68 Kill. In it, what was supposed to […]

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