Art: Let the Right One In by Matt Ryan

There’s hardly anything I could say to sum up the near perfection of Let the Right One In—few films blend the horrific with the romantic so seamlessly, yet Tomas Alfredson does it masterfully here. Its story, while simple, is an enthralling coming-of-age shocker that spins the age-old tale of love in a direction that’s every bit […]

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Art: The Invisible Man by Jonathan Burton

Cinema and horror especially owe a lot to Universal’s monsters—they paved a legendary path through film, leaving an undeniably influential print on the genre starting way back in the early 1920’s. Universal went on a monster movie tear that lasted 30 years, spawning many of the genre’s most iconic movie monsters: The Phantom of the Opera, […]

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Art: Poltergeist by Jérémy Pailler

There’s not much I can say about Tobe Hooper’s Poltergeist that hasn’t been said already—it’s a giant in the haunted house genre (especially during the time it was made), because Hooper perfectly captures that paralyzing sense of terror when your own home turns on you. Our home is the place we’re supposed to feel safest, […]

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Art: Crimson Peak by Daniel Danger

You just don’t see movies like Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak anymore. It’s purely a treat to fans of cinema, a multi-layered monster that masterfully blends the age old Gothic romance with a traditional ghost story. It’s a heartbreaking love story with ghosts and murder, and a haunted house tale that has a creeping mystery […]

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Art: IT by Jérémy Pailler

It’s surprising to think about the popularity of Pennywise, who is among the very best monsters in horror, when he has only appeared in a single book and just one mediocre TV adaptation. Most genre icons have an entire franchise backing them up with years to develop their iconic horror status. There’s just something about […]

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Art: Halloween by Jock

Although it can be traced all the way back to the early ’60s, it was films like Mario Bava’s gruesome Bay of Blood (1971), Tobe Hooper’s The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), and Bob Clark’s holiday classic Black Christmas (1974) that mapped the very future of the slasher. In 1978, however, it was John Carpenter’s Halloween that defined the genre—the film left a footprint on horror unlike any […]

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